The National Government want to make more changes to employment law. The changes will result in lower wages. The Government thinks that is a good thing. But low wages are already pushing thousands and thousands of Kiwis to leave for Australia.
The CTU is committed to action on pay and employment equity on all fronts: political, industrial and campaigning. Unions are not alone in calling for pay and employment equity and the CTU and CTU unions are part of the Pay and Employment Equity Coalition.
At least 30% of New Zealand’s workers – over 635,000 people – are in insecure work. We believe it may well cover 50% of the workforce. 95,000 workers have no usual work time, 61,000 workers have no written employment agreement, 573,000 workers earn less than the Living Wage and almost a quarter of a million Kiwi workers say they have experienced discrimination, harassment or bullying at work. 
As the gap between the rich and the poor grows in New Zealand and poverty increases, more and more New Zealanders don't get paid enough to meet their needs, enjoy their lives and participate in society.
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Election 2014

What's New...

  • Labours policies a step change for working people

    “After six long years of working life getting tougher in New Zealand workers have been given a real choice today with the announcement of Labours Industrial Relations policy package.” CTU President Helen Kelly said

    1 day 9 hours ago
  • Rising interest rate and dollar driving manufacturing exports back to Global Financial Crisis levels

    The Council of Trade Unions is calling on the Reserve Bank not to raise interest rates on Thursday.

    1 week 2 days ago
  • Charges laid against forestry employer

    Subsequent to the granting of leave by the District Court, Helen Kelly President of the CTU has filed charges in the Taupo District Court against forestry employer M & A Cross Limited for alleged breaches of the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1993, arising from inquiries made following the death of Charles Finlay, who died at work in the Taumata Forest, Kinleith almost a year ago on Ju

    2 weeks 1 day ago
  • Prices rising where they hurt families most

    “While overall price inflation is still modest, and should give no reason for the Reserve Bank to lift interest rates further, the rises are occurring where they hurt families most: in food, housing and electricity,” says CTU economist Bill Rosenberg.

    CPI rose just 0.3 percent in the quarter, less than most expectations, and 1.6 percent for the year to June.

    2 weeks 1 day ago
  • Low income families hit hardest by global crisis and high housing costs

    “The effects on families of the global financial crisis, lack of adjustment of the accommodation supplement and high housing costs show up in the latest Household Incomes Report from the Ministry of Social Development,” says CTU Economist Bill Rosenberg.

    3 weeks 1 day ago